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Daylight Savings Time

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Daylight Savings Time

Katie Welch, Reporter

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The day that countless individuals dread has finally arrived. On the second Sunday of March each year, clocks are set an hour forward. Consequently, our population loses an hour of sleep. Although the harsh effects of the lost hour of sleep are felt annually, there is always a positive outlook drawn from any situation. Students gave a surprising insight on Daylight Savings.

Sophomore Nick Zanghetti said, “I personally think it is a good thing because although we lose an hour of sleep, we get an extra hour to do things during the day. Especially as an athlete, it affects me because for sports you can’t always practice outside late because it gets dark too soon, but with it, teams can practice a little later. I don’t think it makes too much of a difference during the early spring but as it turns to later spring and more summer it just gets longer which is definitely better for sports, especially if you’re playing on a field with no lights so you can usually finish the game. Overall, I view it as a positive thing.”

Similarly, sophomores Jenny Keth and Caroline Petchark look forward to the extra hours of daylight that comes with Daylight Savings. Petchark claimed that she doesn’t necessarily mind losing an hour of sleep each year if it means getting longer days and more time to enjoy the sunlight. Keth had mixed views on the day, explaining, “Moving the clocks forward is bad for the part that we’re technically losing an hour of sleep. I typically wake up around 6am, but technically, because the clocks are moved forward, my body feels like I’m waking up at 5. However, it’s good because when it’s around 5/6 pm, it won’t be dark like it usually is. The days feel longer and it reminds me that summer is getting closer!”

Keth had mixed views on the day: “Moving the clocks forward is bad for the part that we’re technically losing an hour of sleep. I typically wake up around 6 am, but technically, because the clocks are moved forward, my body feels like I’m waking up at 5. However, it’s good because when it’s around 5/6 pm, it won’t be dark like it usually is. The days feel longer and it reminds me that summer is getting closer!”

Ultimately, Daylight Savings reveals a lot about a person’s perspective. You can either view the glass as half full or half empty. Although Daylight Savings makes it harder to wake up in the morning, the long-term positive effects that are felt outweigh the negative connotations toward the day. Overall, keeping a positive outlook through negative situations makes life a lot easier!

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