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2024 Senior Awards Ceremony
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Cooking with Culture: Making Lumpia

Lumpia, a kind of spring rolls, are widely available in the Philippines and Indonesia. Lumpia are made up of thin pastry skins, called “lumpia wrappers,” that contain savory or sweet contents and mimic paper or crepes. It is frequently offered as a snack or appetizer and can be either fresh (unfried) or deep-fried. Often eaten during Qingming Festival, lumpia are the Indonesian and Filipino versions of Teochew popiah and the Fujianese rùnbƐng.

It is believed that in the 19th century, Chinese immigrants from Fujian brought lumpia to the Dutch East Indies.Because lumpia was developed from the Hokkien dialect of lumpia, it was derived from Fujianese rùnbĐng. Lumpia was brought to Semarang, Central Java, by a Chinese immigrant named Tjoa Thay Yoe, who arrived around the end of the 1800s. This is according to local legend that is passed down through the city. At Pasar Johar in Semarang at the time, Tjoa was a vendor selling a range of pork-based dishes as well as bamboo shoots. At that point, he got to know Wasih, a local Javanese lady who worked as a food seller, selling dishes with potatoes and prawns. After marrying, Thay Yoe and Wasih went on to make and market cuisine, jointly producing and selling lumpia to villages. The dish became widespread overtime and a large part of Asian culture. Mainly being a huge part of Philippine culture.

 

Below is a recipe that student Emerson Lane will be teaching in video above

Traditional Filipino Lumpia:

This is a classic lumpia (fried spring roll) dish from the Philippines. They are packed with a flavorful blend of ground pork, cabbage, and other vegetables, and are formed using paper-thin lumpia wrappers. Lumpia can be served with a sweet chili dipping sauce as an appetizer or side dish.

Prep Time: 40 mins Cook Time: 25 mins Additional Time:5 mins

Total Time:1 hr 10 mins Servings:15 Yield:30 lumpia

Ingredients

1 tablespoon vegetable oil

1 pound ground pork

½ cup chopped onion

2 cloves garlic, crushed

½ cup minced carrots

½ cup chopped green onions

½ cup thinly sliced green cabbage

2 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro (Optional)

1 teaspoon ground black pepper

1 teaspoon salt

1 teaspoon garlic powder

1 teaspoon soy sauce

30 lumpia wrappers

2 cups vegetable oil for frying, or as needed

Directions

Step 1: Heat 1 tablespoon vegetable oil in a wok or large skillet over high heat. Add pork; cook and stir until crumbly and no pink is showing, 5 to 7 minutes. Remove pork from the pan and set aside. Drain grease from the pan, leaving just a thin coating.

Step 2: Add onion and garlic to the pan; cook and stir until fragrant, about 2 minutes. Stir in the cooked pork, carrots, green onions, cabbage, and cilantro. Season with pepper, salt, garlic powder, and soy sauce. Remove from the heat, and set aside until cool enough to handle, about 5 minutes.

Step 3: Assemble lumpia: Place 3 heaping tablespoons of filling diagonally near one corner of a lumpia wrapper, leaving a 1 1/2 inch space at both ends. Fold the side along the length of the filling over the filling, tuck in both ends, and roll neatly and tightly to close. Moisten the other side of the wrapper with water to seal the edge. Transfer to a plate and cover with plastic wrap to retain moisture. Repeat to assemble remaining lumpia.

Step 4: Heat 1/2 inch vegetable oil in a heavy skillet over medium heat for 5 minutes.

Step 5: Slide 3 to 4 lumpia into the hot oil, making sure the seams are facing down. Fry, turning occasionally, until all sides are golden brown, 1 to 2 minutes. Transfer to a paper towel-lined plate to drain. Repeat to fry remaining lumpia. Serve immediately.

 

LILQTPINAY23, LILQTPINAY23. “Traditional Filipino Lumpia.” Allrecipes, www.allrecipes.com/recipe/35151/traditional-filipino-lumpia/. Accessed 20 Nov. 2023. 

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About the Contributor
Alyson Lewis
Alyson Lewis, Reporter
Alyson Lewis is a senior that attends Waterford High School. She has a major interest in writing and producing entertaining content. She lives in Quaker Hill now, but has moved many times. She lives with her mother, father, older sister, little sister, three dogs, three cats, and two goats. In her free time she enjoys playing soccer, listening to music, playing the guitar, and cooking. 
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